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Community Celebration

JUNETEENTH 2021: A YEAR AND COUNTING!

AS OF SATURDAY, JUNE 19TH, 2021, BABA OMARI TAHIR’S RE-OCCUPATION TO LIBERATE THE AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM’S BUILDING FROM IMPERIALISM’S NEO-COLONIAL APARTHEID HAS BEEN ONGOING FOR A FULL YEAR!

IN SOLIDARITY WITH AAHM&CC, BABA OMARI, BABA EARL DEBNAM, AND THE SPIRIT OF THE LATE MICHAEL GREENWOOD AND ISAIAH EDWARDS, THE PEOPLE OF HISTORIC AFRICATOWN HAVE RECLAIMED THE FULL EASTERN COURTYARD OF THE AAHM&CC PROPERTY, FROM THE MAIN BUILDING’S FRONT DOOR TO THE EAST BOUNDARY OF JIMI HENDRIX PARK (WHICH WAS ONCE COLEMAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S PARKING LOT)!

THE CELEBRATION OF THIS MAGNIFICENT JUNETEENTH ANNIVERSARY WAS, ONCE AGAIN A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS!

AS ALWAYS, LET THE RECORD SPEAK FOR ITSELF!

Especially Important: 3:36:00 through 3:40:45 and 6:04:00 through 6:18:00.

Categories
Community Celebration

South Seattle Emerald Covers: HONORING OUR BLACK WALL STREETS!

PHOTO ESSAY: ‘Honoring Our Black Wall Streets’ Commemorates Tulsa Massacre

by Ronnie Estoque and Susan Fried


Almost 200 Black-owned businesses participated in “Honoring Our Black Wall Streets” on Memorial Day, in the Central District, to honor Black Wall Street on the 100th anniversary of its tragic destruction. The memorial event was organized by King County Equity Now, Black Dot, and Africatown community organizers and celebrated the resilience of the local Black business community.  

In May of 1921, a white mob in Tulsa, Oklahoma attacked the predominantly Black neighborhood of Greenwood, which was known as “Black Wall Street.” The Tulsa Massacre claimed the lives of around 300 Black people living in the community, with many of their businesses and homes burnt to the ground in the riot. Activism in recent years has shed more light on this horrendous event, and those in the Black community in Seattle are continuing to honor the legacy of Black Wall Street through continuing their demands of anti-gentrification measures and reinvestment into historically Black neighborhoods.

In addition to all kinds of businesses including clothing, book, jewelry and food vendors, numerous artists were also represented on Monday. The event was kicked off by the singing of the Black National Anthem and an honoring of Black people who have passed away. The day also included live performances and a community “Electric Slide” for over 20 minutes. Although the day acknowledged a terrible moment in American history, the people gathered paid tribute to the Black community of Tulsa, Oklahoma by supporting Seattle’s many Black-owned businesses and artists.

A car blockade blocks off the intersection of 23rd Ave South and South Jackson Street.
A car blockade blocks off the intersection of 23rd Ave South and South Jackson Street. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Photo of a male-presenting individual walking past a tented stand selling graphic T-shirts.
Close to 200 Vendors sold their wares at “Honoring Our Black Wall Streets.” (Photo: Susan Fried)
Photo of a Black-presenting youth in a orange T-shirt that reads "Button Bros" plays with bubbles at "Honoring Our Black Wall Streets."
Blake Arms, 8, co-owner of Button Bros, takes a break from selling his products to have some fun. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Photo of Shea Black standing with her art in her tent at "Honoring Our Black Wall Streets."
Artist Shea Black was one of almost 200 businesses, entrepreneurs, and artists who participated in “Honoring Our Black Wall Streets.” (Photo: Susan Fried)
Shea Black stands by one of her most recent paintings.
Shea Black stands by one of her most recent paintings. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Some people walk by a display of clothes being sold by African Print Takeover.
Some people walk by a display of clothes being sold by African Print Takeover. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Photo of a Black-presenting, female-presenting individual sitting under an EZ-up tent with tables filled with their colorful wares for sale.
Angela Unique (Photo: Susan Fried)
Karlos Dillard poses with “Ward of the State: A Memoir of Foster Care,” a book he wrote sharing his experience growing up in the foster care system in Detroit.
Karlos Dillard poses with “Ward of the State: A Memoir of Foster Care,” a book he wrote sharing his experience growing up in the foster care system in Detroit. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Rodney King (center), owner of King's Pen LLC, showcases his unique art that commentates on topics such as activism, sports, and rap.
Rodney King (center), owner of King’s Pen LLC, showcases his unique art that commentates on topics such as activism, sports, and rap. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Black-presenting, male-presenting individual sits with his art for sale.
Artist Jerald Butler (Photo: Susan Fried)
Trae Holiday, creative director of King County Equity Now and producer at Converge Media, was one of the hosts for the afternoon.
Trae Holiday, creative director of King County Equity Now and producer at Converge Media, was one of the hosts for the afternoon. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
A Black community elder pours water from a water bottle after shouting “Aṣẹ!” and the names Black lives that have passed away.
A Black community elder pours water from a water bottle after shouting “Aṣẹ!” and the names Black lives that have passed away. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Nu Black Arts West, the oldest African American theatre company in the PNW, performs live on stage.
Nu Black Arts West, the oldest African American theatre company in the PNW, performs live on stage. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Black-presenting, female-presenting individual stands holds a mic in one hand and a raised fist with the other, speaking about Black Wall Street and the Tulsa Massacre.
Gwendolyn Phillips Coats, a member of Nu Black Arts West, tells the story of Black Wall Street and the Tulsa Massacre. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Local Black artist Unapologetically Jason sings the Black National Anthem.
Local Black artist Unapologetically Jason sings the Black National Anthem. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Hundreds of people danced the Electric Slide for 20 minutes.
Hundreds of people danced the Electric Slide for 20 minutes. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Young performer and entrepreneur Skye Dior performs before a large crowd.
Young performer and entrepreneur Skye Dior performs before a large crowd. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Nana Ahmed and 2-year-old Jameela enjoy a performance during “Honoring Our Black Wall Streets.”
Nana Ahmed and 2-year-old Jameela enjoy a performance during “Honoring Our Black Wall Streets.” (Photo: Susan Fried)

Ronnie Estoque is a Seattle-based storyteller and aspiring documentarian. He is driven to uplift marginalized voices in the South Seattle community through his writing, photography, and videography. You can keep up with his work by following his Twitter and Instagram.

Susan Fried is a 40-year veteran photographer. In addition to weddings, portraits, and commercial work she did early in her career, she has been the Skanner Newspaper’s Seattle photographer for nearly 25 years. Her images have appeared in a variety of publications including the University of Washington Daily, the Seattle Globalist, Crosscut, and more. She’s been an Emerald contributor since 2015. Follow her on Instagram @fried.susan.

Categories
Community Celebration

MAY 22, MALCOLM X WEEK 2021 HIP HOP SOUL RALLY: A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS!

a tremendous success

Let the record speak for itself.

https://fb.watch/5Gx8aVHFqn/

Categories
Community Celebration

Community Celebration – 75 Years of Life! BABA OMARI TAHIR-GARRETT!

SUNDAY, MAY 2ND, 2021, 2PM-6PM, JIMI HENDRIX PARK!

75th Birthday Community Appreciation Celebration for Baba Omari Tahir-Garrett
Join family, friends and community to honor a Central District native son, visionary and Seattle’s #1 fighter for freedom, justice and equality! This Sunday May 2nd, 2pm-6pm at Jimi Hendrix Park.

Come and share your personal stories or memories of impact. If Omari has blessed or positively impacted your life as a family member, a friend, a coach, a teacher, a mentor, by giving your words of wisdom, fought alongside you or for you, provided an open door or helping hand, please come out and return the love as we celebrate 75 years of life and still going strong!

There is an old saying “Give me my flowers while I can still smell them”.

For info on how to support the event call 206.569.8329.

If you are unable to attend but would like to make contribution you can do so online at African American Heritage Museum gofundme page.

Categories
Community Celebration

AFRICAN AAMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER IS HOSTING THE ANNUAL TREES FOR PEACE FUNDRAISER! (OPEN AS OF THE 35TH FOUNDERS DAY! NOVEMBER 23D!

The Annual Holiday Trees For Peace Fundraiser is a community tradition that has been co-sponsored by the AAHM&CC and the Umojafest Peace Center for over a decade!

Started in 2008, this tree sale for the defense of Black lives has been organized each year ever since (with the one exception of 2019, when it was rudely and illegally interrupted by the gentrification firm known as “Lake Union Partners”, who chose to breach their contract with the African American community that year).

In 2020, starting on our 35th Annual Founders Day! (November 23rd), the African American Heritage Museum & Cultural Center is proudly hosting this community function at OUR OWN LAND AND BUILDING, rightfully purchased by us in 1998!

We are very thankful for all of the participants in this year’s George Floyd peoples democratic uprising against lynching and apartheid, who are enforcing Article 17 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights so that we can finally use our own land!

Our affordably price trees are right to fit YOUR budget.

Tell all your family, friends, church and other groups about this opportunity to continue being part of the change.

Trees are available for pick up daily at 2300 S Massachusetts St, Seattle, WA 98144.

To place your order today, please call 206 717-1685  

If you do not want a tree but would like to support by making a contribution please do so at https://gf.me/u/ypksuc.

Thank you for your consideration and we hope that you can help us make the promise of change a reality.  

Thank you.

The African American Heritage Museum & Cultural Center

Categories
Community Celebration

BLACK INSTITUTIONS MATTER!

AAHM&CC 35TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION!

CLICK HERE TO WATCH A NARRATED PRESENTATION OF THE SLIDESHOW BELOW

On November 23rd, 2020, the African American Heritage Museum & Cultural Center literally celebrated 12,784 continuous days of protest against the overfunding of police and the underfunding of positive community institutions!

On that day, from 1-6pm, the people gathered for a safe socially distanced celebration of our Founder’s Day!

Watch our video of the event to learn about the true history of the occupation of the Colman School from the freedom fighters who began the struggle over three decades ago.

The people enjoyed free screen printing, live performances, light refreshments, and HOLIDAY TREES FOR PEACE!https://africanamericanheritagemuseumandculturalcenter.org/2020/11/23/african-aamerican-heritage-museum-and-cultural-center-to-host-the-annual-trees-for-peace-fundraiser-opening-on-the-35th-founders-day-november-23d/

We also revealed our NEW HISTORY EXHIBIT! and discussed how to support the ongoing struggle for a world-class Black institution that will fight against displacement and gentrification here in Seattle!

Alongside our HISTORY EXHIBIT!, we also proudly unveiled our latest traveling art exhibition: a photography display by renowned local artist Inye Wokoma!

We live streamed our event via our IG and FB! #FreeTheLand#PayTheFee#BlackInstituitionsMatter